3 Years Into Personal Growth, Finding Limits Is Hard

When you push yourself to grow, finding comfortable limits is harder than you might expect.

Leigh Victoria Fisher, MS

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Illustration of a person practicing self-healing in pursuit of personal growth.
Illustration Courtesy of VectorMine

Personal growth means something a little different to every person. We’re all pursuing unique goals and no two people are exactly alike. Personal development journies run on different timelines and look quite different for everyone. While so much varies, there are some commonalities too—especially in the roadblocks you might end up facing,

The pitfall I keep stumbling into on my journey is figuring out what my limits are. The biggest pillars of my personal growth journey are being a more active writer and artist, working on my physical and mental health, and being more present in my day-to-day life. It may be just three things, but actually making progress on them has required some dramatic lifestyle changes over the past three years. Since I’m trying to craft myself into a better version of myself, it can be hard to realize when I fall into bad old habits of overdoing it.

If you’ve experienced a lot of stagnation, it’s hard to slow down when you need to.

“Self-care means giving yourself permission to pause.” — Cecilia Tran

If you’ve had times in your life when you felt too defeated and exhausted to take small steps toward your goals, it’s very easy to fall into self-destructive work habits. I was the worst procrastinator back in high school and early in undergrad. I would feel stuck and overwhelmed, wouldn’t work on things, then melt down from stress doing everything at the last minute. My work could have been a lot better and living like that did not bode well for my anxiety.

Worse yet, I fell into a very bleak depression after undergrad because I wasn’t working in the field I wanted to be in. I couldn’t bring myself to work on my creative personal projects since I felt too emotionally drained from work every day. This went on for months and my depression got worse and worse, bringing me into very dark places. It took me years to claw myself out of that pit and it’s still a process I work on every day.

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Leigh Victoria Fisher, MS

Brooklyn-based writer and poet. Designer in NYC. Drinks books and loves coffee. Has an MS from NYU in Integrated Design & Media. Working on an MFA in Fiction.